Policing...

Jason Simmons

NRL Captain
3,103
3,360
Here’s one for you...

If there are three cars traveling on the highway in wet weather

Car 1 in front
Car 2 middle
Car 3 back

Car 1 slams breaks on causing car 2 to do the same
Car 3 goes up the ass of car 2

Who is in the wrong
Car 3, for following too close.
Post automatically merged:

Unless you have dash cam showing car 1 being a break checking idiot
They could get some love then too... 😂
 
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Strop

QCup Player
550
802
I’ll join in. What triggers a firearms safe storage inspection these days? Is it just random, or is it a progression from A - Z in a logical order as time permits? Also, is it still standard practice to make contact and arrange a time for the inspection? Have heard a second hand story of an unannounced inspection where the officers spoke to a neighbour when nobody answered at the firearm owners house and told them the reason they were there when asked. Firearm owner is still waiting to hear back from the OIC about what the hell they were thinking.
 

Jason Simmons

NRL Captain
3,103
3,360
I’ll join in. What triggers a firearms safe storage inspection these days? Is it just random, or is it a progression from A - Z in a logical order as time permits? Also, is it still standard practice to make contact and arrange a time for the inspection? Have heard a second hand story of an unannounced inspection where the officers spoke to a neighbour when nobody answered at the firearm owners house and told them the reason they were there when asked. Firearm owner is still waiting to hear back from the OIC about what the hell they were thinking.
Every station gets tasked by Weapons Licencing to do these. It is completely random, because we never know when they will turn up, they just usually come through as a bunch for your local area, unless there is something specific (usually criminal charges against a licenced weapon holder, or perhaps some DV or mental health issue).

It is usual practice to pre-arrange an inspection appointment. Without a warrant we cannot force a weapons licence holder to allow us entry to inspect the firearms, however should said weapons licence holder, wish to continue to hold that licence, it’s a good idea...

Sometimes we have to do it unannounced as well, in the case of a DV incident or something along those lines. It may be the case there was some issue that meant police did it that way, or perhaps they had been trying to raise the weapons licence holder for some time and hadn’t been able to get hold of them, so this was the only choice.
 
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Strop

QCup Player
550
802
Every station gets tasked by Weapons Licencing to do these. It is completely random, because we never know when they will turn up, they just usually come through as a bunch for your local area, unless there is something specific (usually criminal charges against a licenced weapon holder, or perhaps some DV or mental health issue).

It is usual practice to pre-arrange an inspection appointment. Without a warrant we cannot force a weapons licence holder to allow us entry to inspect the firearms, however should said weapons licence holder, wish to continue to hold that licence, it’s a good idea...

Sometimes we have to do it unannounced as well, in the case of a DV incident or something along those lines. It may be the case there was some issue that meant police did it that way, or perhaps they had been trying to raise the weapons licence holder for some time and hadn’t been able to get hold of them, so this was the only choice.
Cheers for that. Completely understand the unannounced visit in certain situations. The fellow mentioned is doing fifo work (and is a cleanskin), but no attempted contact had been made prior to them informing his neighbours he has firearms. It’s a townhouse complex so not really ideal have that knowledge floating around. I’ve heard a few tales of even during pre-arranged visits where the licence holder didn’t have things secured properly, ammunition floating around the place - a complete shambles. Some people are just stupid, I guess and don’t deserve to keep their licence.

Anyway, feel for you guys doing the inspections with all the errors that come out of WLB. It’s frustrating for owners and the police when serial numbers don’t match with the info from licencing. I try and get an updated list and get things fixed first so as not to waste your time when doing inspections. Which is interesting in itself, as technically isn’t it only supposed to be a storage inspection? As in, correct type and mounting of safe for particular categories? Not that I care, as I’m completely anal with paperwork and storage, so it’s fine by me, but I wonder if you get the odd knob that wants to argue the point?
 

Jason Simmons

NRL Captain
3,103
3,360
Cheers for that. Completely understand the unannounced visit in certain situations. The fellow mentioned is doing fifo work (and is a cleanskin), but no attempted contact had been made prior to them informing his neighbours he has firearms. It’s a townhouse complex so not really ideal have that knowledge floating around. I’ve heard a few tales of even during pre-arranged visits where the licence holder didn’t have things secured properly, ammunition floating around the place - a complete shambles. Some people are just stupid, I guess and don’t deserve to keep their licence.

Anyway, feel for you guys doing the inspections with all the errors that come out of WLB. It’s frustrating for owners and the police when serial numbers don’t match with the info from licencing. I try and get an updated list and get things fixed first so as not to waste your time when doing inspections. Which is interesting in itself, as technically isn’t it only supposed to be a storage inspection? As in, correct type and mounting of safe for particular categories? Not that I care, as I’m completely anal with paperwork and storage, so it’s fine by me, but I wonder if you get the odd knob that wants to argue the point?
Checking the storage meets the current legislated requirements is part of it (for weapons and ammunition) but checking the licences and registered weapons is too.

The tasks come in with a list of the registered weapons and their particulars. Confirming they are present, haven’t been obviously modified, the storage is reasonable and the owner has their licence available, is all we really look for on general inspections. If WLB have any specific concerns they will conduct their own enquiries.

As you probably know, most coppers aren‘t really all that expert in firearms. I usually try to give those tasks, to someone who has a but of a clue, but that isn’t always possible...
 

tommy

State of Origin Captain
8,552
8,480
No, but good cunts give way and realise that until we're halfway out, we can't see shit.
Good cunts also stop reversing and give way when they realise traffic with right of way is there. People that see you and cut you off anyway are dicks.
 

soup

State of Origin Captain
9,609
7,498
T’ba
Good cunts also stop reversing and give way when they realise traffic with right of way is there. People that see you and cut you off anyway are dicks.
Try doing it with your two little kids in the backseat, in a small sedan between two fucking 4x4’s (that have never been off bitumen - or traffic islands, lol) knowing that your children are prone while you can’t see a fucking thing.
 
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tommy

State of Origin Captain
8,552
8,480
Try doing it with your two little kids in the backseat, in a small sedan between two fucking 4x4’s (that have never been off bitumen - or traffic islands, lol) knowing that your children are prone while you can’t see a fucking thing.
But I'm talking about people that do see you and keep coming anyway. You either see them there or you don't, whether there are kids in the back or not.
 

soup

State of Origin Captain
9,609
7,498
T’ba
But I'm talking about people that do see you and keep coming anyway. You either see them there or you don't, whether there are kids in the back or not.
You don’t know how long that person that is reversing has had to wait for a compassionate person to let them go.
 

soup

State of Origin Captain
9,609
7,498
T’ba
I often weigh it up and go, my car is older than yours and I know you don’t want to hurt your beemer, and I’ve been waiting for fucking ever so hold the **** up while I get out. Not always, but sometimes.
 

john1420

NRL Player
Hi Jason Simmons Jason Simmons
I have a question about AVO's. My wife is a counsellor and she has a client who claims to have had an AVO taken out on her, and that the AVO contains a requirement to hand over a piece of property as well as the usual requirement of not coming within a certain distance of the other person named in the AVO.

Is this possible? We thought an AVO was only ever about keeping people apart, and not anything about returning an item.

Would value your thoughts :)
 

Jason Simmons

NRL Captain
3,103
3,360
Hi Jason Simmons Jason Simmons
I have a question about AVO's. My wife is a counsellor and she has a client who claims to have had an AVO taken out on her, and that the AVO contains a requirement to hand over a piece of property as well as the usual requirement of not coming within a certain distance of the other person named in the AVO.

Is this possible? We thought an AVO was only ever about keeping people apart, and not anything about returning an item.

Would value your thoughts :)
I assume this is based in Queensland? We don’t have AVO’s up here. AVO’s as I understand them in NSW at least, can be taken out for a range of circumstances against almost anybody, assuming certain conditions are met. Other than that, I can’t offer much more insight on AVO’s because I’ve never even seen one, let alone read up on them.

We have Domestic Violence Protection Orders in Qld and these require a ‘relevant relationship’ to exist between the parties -> intimate relationships, family relationships or inter-personal care relationships. So there is a significant difference there. You can’t get a DVO against a complete random in Qld, the way an AVO can be sought in NSW (if I understand them completely).

The reason we have DVO’s (and I assume AVO’s) is because they are a court order based on civil proceedings, rather than criminal proceedings. The difference is significant. Things that would never be allowed to be admitted as evidence in a criminal trial in Australia notably such as hearsay, can be admitted in a DVO hearing, because the object of the exercise is to protect and prevent harm, rather than produce a finding of guilt (or otherwise) and punish accordingly. Only when an order is in place and it is contravened do things become criminal.

Because a DVO is a civil order with no punishment or specific sanction attached, courts have a significantly larger degree of autonomy with these orders. Every DVO contains mandatory conditions: that a respondent be of good behaviour towards the aggrieved and not commit domestic violence and; that the respondent is prohibited from holding or obtaining a weapons licence and any weapons.

Most orders only have these conditions, however many have extra conditions. 15 extra conditions is my personal record that I have seen and to me personally, many seem redundant, but they are in there anyway. Things like no contact orders, do not approach within 100m of the aggrieved when they are at any place etc, are quite common.

To answer your specific question, yes property recovery orders are common nowadays in DVO’s. Often property (and at law this term includes things such as money in accounts, telco services and so on) is used as a controlling mechanism by respondents against aggrieved persons. It is not much use for example for a court to order that parties have no contact, when a respondent has complete control of some bank account, or some property (a vehicle for example) that the aggrieved needs to continue to live their life normally. The way around such control, is for a court to order the respondent to return or arrange to return this property or access to it (in the case of joint property such as an account) to the aggrieved.

Hope that helps.
 
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Jason Simmons

NRL Captain
3,103
3,360
If there is a car parked and they are reversing out of the car space, do the other cars have to give way to the reversing car ?
No. Technically the car reversing out has to give way to the other traffic, as it is the one entering the roadway, or ‘road related area’ as the case may be.
 

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