Policing...

Dexter

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If there is a car parked and they are reversing out of the car space, do the other cars have to give way to the reversing car ?
I don't understand why people drive into a car space. You have to reverse at some point be it in or out.
I would much rather reverse into a space where everything your reversing towards is stationary then drive out. No having to watch out for pedestrians trolleys or other cars coming from a blind spot.
 

soup

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I don't understand why people drive into a car space. You have to reverse at some point be it in or out.
I would much rather reverse into a space where everything your reversing towards is stationary then drive out. No having to watch out for pedestrians trolleys or other cars coming from a blind spot.
Not always possible. Many stipulate ‘nose-in’.
 

Dexter

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Not always possible. Many stipulate ‘nose-in’.
Really?, I can't recall the last time I have seen that. Diagonal parking obviously has to be nose in but that is far easier to reverse out of.
 

Allo

NRL Captain
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I don't understand why people drive into a car space. You have to reverse at some point be it in or out.
I would much rather reverse into a space where everything your reversing towards is stationary then drive out. No having to watch out for pedestrians trolleys or other cars coming from a blind spot.
Pressure from other car park vehicles waiting to go past them and people watching you and you being able to se. Also, for a lot of people turning into a park forwards and then reversing straight backwards, turning as you come back out is far easier than turning while reversing in and straightening up.

I think the reversing out thing was less of an issue in the days when regular cars weren’t surrounded by SUVs and 4WDs

(note: I’m not fussed by reversing, but I’m lazy so I always drive nose in)
 

soup

State of Origin Captain
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I love the ignorant pedestrians who just walk behind you whilst your reversing. Like seriously just wait 5 seconds
Most of the fucktards have earphones in. My horn on the Mazda 6 is a very beefy air horn. I’m pretty sure a few people have shat themselves when I hit it.
 

john1420

NRL Player
I assume this is based in Queensland? We don’t have AVO’s up here. AVO’s as I understand them in NSW at least, can be taken out for a range of circumstances against almost anybody, assuming certain conditions are met. Other than that, I can’t offer much more insight on AVO’s because I’ve never even seen one, let alone read up on them.

We have Domestic Violence Protection Orders in Qld and these require a ‘relevant relationship’ to exist between the parties -> intimate relationships, family relationships or inter-personal care relationships. So there is a significant difference there. You can’t get a DVO against a complete random in Qld, the way an AVO can be sought in NSW (if I understand them completely).

The reason we have DVO’s (and I assume AVO’s) is because they are a court order based on civil proceedings, rather than criminal proceedings. The difference is significant. Things that would never be allowed to be admitted as evidence in a criminal trial in Australia notably such as hearsay, can be admitted in a DVO hearing, because the object of the exercise is to protect and prevent harm, rather than produce a finding of guilt (or otherwise) and punish accordingly. Only when an order is in place and it is contravened do things become criminal.

Because a DVO is a civil order with no punishment or specific sanction attached, courts have a significantly larger degree of autonomy with these orders. Every DVO contains mandatory conditions: that a respondent be of good behaviour towards the aggrieved and not commit domestic violence and; that the respondent is prohibited from holding or obtaining a weapons licence and any weapons.

Most orders only have these conditions, however many have extra conditions. 15 extra conditions is my personal record that I have seen and to me personally, many seem redundant, but they are in there anyway. Things like no contact orders, do not approach within 100m of the aggrieved when they are at any place etc, are quite common.

To answer your specific question, yes property recovery orders are common nowadays in DVO’s. Often property (and at law this term includes things such as money in accounts, telco services and so on) is used as a controlling mechanism by respondents against aggrieved persons. It is not much use for example for a court to order that parties have no contact, when a respondent has complete control of some bank account, or some property (a vehicle for example) that the aggrieved needs to continue to live their life normally. The way around such control, is for a court to order the respondent to return or arrange to return this property or access to it (in the case of joint property such as an account) to the aggrieved.

Hope that helps.
Thanks heaps Jason Simmons Jason Simmons
 

lynx000

NRL Captain
3,851
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Waiting to win lotto
I assume this is based in Queensland? We don’t have AVO’s up here. AVO’s as I understand them in NSW at least, can be taken out for a range of circumstances against almost anybody, assuming certain conditions are met. Other than that, I can’t offer much more insight on AVO’s because I’ve never even seen one, let alone read up on them.

We have Domestic Violence Protection Orders in Qld and these require a ‘relevant relationship’ to exist between the parties -> intimate relationships, family relationships or inter-personal care relationships. So there is a significant difference there. You can’t get a DVO against a complete random in Qld, the way an AVO can be sought in NSW (if I understand them completely).

The reason we have DVO’s (and I assume AVO’s) is because they are a court order based on civil proceedings, rather than criminal proceedings. The difference is significant. Things that would never be allowed to be admitted as evidence in a criminal trial in Australia notably such as hearsay, can be admitted in a DVO hearing, because the object of the exercise is to protect and prevent harm, rather than produce a finding of guilt (or otherwise) and punish accordingly. Only when an order is in place and it is contravened do things become criminal.

Because a DVO is a civil order with no punishment or specific sanction attached, courts have a significantly larger degree of autonomy with these orders. Every DVO contains mandatory conditions: that a respondent be of good behaviour towards the aggrieved and not commit domestic violence and; that the respondent is prohibited from holding or obtaining a weapons licence and any weapons.

Most orders only have these conditions, however many have extra conditions. 15 extra conditions is my personal record that I have seen and to me personally, many seem redundant, but they are in there anyway. Things like no contact orders, do not approach within 100m of the aggrieved when they are at any place etc, are quite common.

To answer your specific question, yes property recovery orders are common nowadays in DVO’s. Often property (and at law this term includes things such as money in accounts, telco services and so on) is used as a controlling mechanism by respondents against aggrieved persons. It is not much use for example for a court to order that parties have no contact, when a respondent has complete control of some bank account, or some property (a vehicle for example) that the aggrieved needs to continue to live their life normally. The way around such control, is for a court to order the respondent to return or arrange to return this property or access to it (in the case of joint property such as an account) to the aggrieved.

Hope that helps.
Our equivalent when you want to get an order against a random (not someone you are in a relationship with) is a Peace and Good Behaviour Order.
 
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Jason Simmons

NRL Player
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Our equivalent when you want to get an order against a random (not someone you are in a relationship with) is a Peace and Good Behaviour Order.
I hope it’s not equivalent. Because if they are, then an AVO is every bit as toothless as a ‘Peace and Good Behaviour Order’ is...
- Merged

That's a tough sounding name.
A tough sounding name, for something as pathetic and useless as wet paper is...
 
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Super Freak

International Captain
Staff
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Brisbane
Really?, I can't recall the last time I have seen that. Diagonal parking obviously has to be nose in but that is far easier to reverse out of.
One thing I've noticed working at a shopping centre is that A LOT of people don't seem to know how to reverse into a spot without taking several minutes trying to achieve it.

Which is strange because a lot of cars these days have reversing cameras which just makes the whole process a lot easier.
 

Nashy

International Captain
Staff
41,195
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Brisbane
One thing I've noticed working at a shopping centre is that A LOT of people don't seem to know how to reverse into a spot without taking several minutes trying to achieve it.

Which is strange because a lot of cars these days have reversing cameras which just makes the whole process a lot easier.
A lot of cars don't too, and some reversing camera setups on new cars have a pretty steep learning curve.

But anyway. I'm very much in the, if you reverse into a busy shopping centre carpark you're a gronk. Just pull in, and get out of the traffic, instead of going past the park, stopping all the traffic and then reversing. Just pull in.
 

Dexter

State of Origin Rep
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A lot of cars don't too, and some reversing camera setups on new cars have a pretty steep learning curve.

But anyway. I'm very much in the, if you reverse into a busy shopping centre carpark you're a gronk. Just pull in, and get out of the traffic, instead of going past the park, stopping all the traffic and then reversing. Just pull in.
If you ( not you personally) can't reverse in efficiently then coming out is much harder and takes longer
So much more going on behind you and turning towards the car next to you as well.
First world problem though .
 
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Dash

NRL Captain
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Brisbane
Backing out is way easier than backing in. You've got a whole road to aim at, instead of a space a car width wide.
 

Morkel

International Captain
Staff
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My wife is a fucking champ at reverse parking. I think it's a matter of no fear. She's never fucked it up.
 

soup

State of Origin Captain
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My wife is a fucking champ at reverse parking. I think it's a matter of no fear. She's never fucked it up.
She must be a unicorn. I’ve never met a woman who can confidently do it.

EDIT: Just realised that we are talking about different things; I was thinking parallel parking. My mrs can reverse like a truck driver after growing up on a farm with a trailer. Still can’t parallel park though, strangely.
 

Morkel

International Captain
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She must be a unicorn. I’ve never met a woman who can confidently do it.

EDIT: Just realised that we are talking about different things; I was thinking parallel parking. My mrs can reverse like a truck driver after growing up on a farm with a trailer. Still can’t parallel park though, strangely.
She can do both. I can't parallel park.
 

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